Request Appointment  
Menu

No excuses. Lift weights at any age! Advice from a 65 year old.

No excuses. Lift weights at any age! Advice from a 65 year old.

A post by Abby Halpin, DPT

 Yes, we are physical therapists, but we don’t just help people get back to where they were before an injury. We also help people level up after rehab.  As experts of the human movement system, we pay attention to what is good for it, and we teach it.  Muscle loss as we age is a huge problem. It affects our mobility, confidence, puts us at risk for falls, and decreases our longevity.  I recently came across this article in the New York Times, and thought, why not have a client tell her story.

Kristin, a participant in Movement Systems fitness programming, was interviewed to share her experience with weight training as a 65 year old. 

(Abby) What is your favorite strength training exercise and why?
(Kristin) “Deadlifting is my favorite.  That’s been a vast surprise to me since I never thought I’d do free weights, let alone deadlift. Being the age I am (65), I grew up thinking  deadlifting was for hunky guys in sweaty, competitive gyms. So wrong! I’ve found that I love how deadlifting makes me concentrate totally, both physically and mentally. It is thrilling to feel myself getting stronger, and to measure my progress by the increasing weight I can lift.” 
 
What led you to begin your strength training program?
“I was in a serious car accident and started physiotherapy with Abby in early 2017.  I’ve always been physically active, but I lost a lot of strength during my recovery so when physiotherapy ended I started doing physical training with her. I also needed to do more weight-bearing exercise to prevent bone loss as I age. Training one-on-one with Abby,  who knows my body quirks and can cheerfully push and encourage me,  has been immensely helpful. I started my physiotherapy with two-pound weights.  Now I can deadlift 145 pounds!” 
 
Have you noticed a change in how you move about your day since beginning your weightlifting routine?
“I love feeling stronger. And lifting things in everyday life  – from heavy shopping bags to suitcases and boxes of books – is much easier. I’m more conscious about my overall posture/alignment and it has improved.  And I’m less afraid of injuring myself.” 
 
What has surprised you the most about strength training?
“What has surprised me most about deadlifting in particular is how almost meditative it can be since it needs such  physical and mental focus. As I lift heavier weights, I’m working on and appreciating the mental/emotional side of it,  how it fosters the need to be positive and believe you can do it. It’s wonderful to talk positively to one’s self.” 
 
Is there anything else about your lifting life you’d like to share?
“It’s a cliche, but you truly are never too old to start.  Your body and brain will thank you.”
If you are interested in learning how you can safely and confidently begin strength training, consult a physical therapist. We are equipped to perform health screening prior to beginning a program, and we are experts in exercise prescription for the human movement system.

Yoga 101: Tips to make the most of your Yoga practice

Yoga 101: Tips to make the most of your Yoga practice

By Terri Sullivan DPT, OCS

 

I’ve practiced yoga for over 15 years. Initially when I was practicing, the emphasis was on stretching. With more intensive study, however, I learned more details about the poses and integrated it into my practice as well as how I teach others to enhance their practice.  For example, a key question to ask is “Are you using your legs?”  You should be.  Strength and feeling certain muscles groups during poses is extremely important.  The more grounded, stable, aligned, and strong a person is in their pose, the less chance of injury.   Below, I’ve profiled a few common yoga poses, proper alignment of the legs, and which leg muscles should be targeted during practice.

Mountain Pose (Tadasana)

  • Keep weight balanced in the 4 corners of each foot
  • Toe mound down
  • Move from the ankle to help pull up arch vs tensing arch
  • Firm muscles of the legs (glut med, quads) without locking the knees
  • Create energetic lift from inner foot to the pelvis

 

Warrior 2 (Virabradasana 2)

  • Back foot turned in slightly, but still connecting with all four corners of the foot, hip in slight internal rotation
  • Front knee moved out towards pinky toe to help feel the deep hip lateral rotators
  • Press into front heel to help pull up through the inner thigh
  • Top of the pelvis level with the floor

 

Serpent Pose (Bhujangasana)

  • Anchor the pubic bone, ASIS, or whole pelvis to the floor, making sure the core is engaged and there is no back pain
  • Move the sacrum away from the lumbar spine
  • Lightly tighten the gluts, but not clenched
  • Feet straight, not turned in or out
  • Lightly squeezing the inner thighs towards each other to help recruit the pelvic floor

 

Triangle Pose (Trikonasana)

  • Unlock the knees by turning the legs on (to help prevent hyperextension) pulling up with inner thighs and quads
  • Externally rotate front femur bone while keeping the front big toe mound down
  • Tilt pelvis over front leg without curving the spine

 

 

Bridge Pose (Setu Bandhasana)

  • Feet hip with apart and parallel, heels directly under knees
  • Roll outer thighs in
  • Elongate tailbone with a tail tuck
  • Pressing into heels to feel the gluts and hamstrings

 

Terri Sullivan DPT, OCS, Certified Yoga Instructor

 

Benefits of Aerobic Exercise

 Aerobic Exercise and Benefits of Walking

By Kendall Wisehart DPT, ATC

What is aerobic exercise?

  • Simply put aerobic exercise or “cardio” is activity that requires increased activity of the heart to pump oxygen rich blood the muscles.
  • Examples include walking, running, hiking, and swimming
  • Aerobic refers to “with oxygen” whereas anaerobic refers to “without oxygen”

Benefits

  • Mental benefits include increased confidence, emotional stability, memory and brain function
  • Physical benefits include strengthened heart and lungs, lower cholesterol, improved immune function, and lower blood pressure – among many others!
  • Fitness benefits include improved muscle tone, stamina, and energy levels for both work and play

Disease Prevention (via ACSM)

  • Seniors who walk 6-9 miles/week are less likely to suffer from mental decline as they age, including dementia
  • Walking 30 minutes/day, 5 days/week, along with diet changes, can halve the risk of Type II Diabetes
  • Walking 30 minutes/day, 5 days/week can halve the risk of heart disease and reduce stress, cholesterol, and blood pressure
  • Walking can reduce pain and improve function, mobility, mood, and quality of life without worsening symptoms for those with arthritis
  • Walking triggers endorphins, promotes relaxation, and can help prevent anxiety and depression

Walking 30 minutes/day, 5 days/week can halve the risk of heart disease and reduce stress, cholesterol, and blood pressure

Other benefits of walking (via ACSM)

  • Walking 45 minutes/day halves your odds of catching a cold
  • Walking 1 minute can extend life by 1.5 to 2 minutes
  • Walking 20-25 minutes/week can extend life by several years!

How do I get started?

  • If you have health issues – talk to your doctor and ask to see a physical therapist
  • Choose an activity that you enjoy. It can be as easy as walking or gardening or as intense as hiking or running
  • Find a friend! Having the support of a friend of family member will help keep you going

How much should I do?

  • For most healthy individuals: 30 minutes, 5 days a week of moderate intensity aerobic exercise OR 20 minutes of high intensity aerobic exercise
  • A quick way to gauge intensity is Target Heart Rate. To calculate: 220 – (your age) x 70%. Example: 220 – 45 years old x .70 = 122.5 beats per minute (bpm)
  • You should be able to carry on a conversation with your walking partner without shortness of breath

Can I over-do it?

  • Absolutely! Just like a sedentary lifestyle, overactivity can have its own negative consequences like injury and reduced immune function
  • Developing a consistent exercise routine is key in preventing over-training, this includes rest days
  • A workout or training session is only as effective as how much you can recover from it

What’s considered “in-shape”?

  • Everyone will have their own unique definition of fitness, related to their fitness goal
  • A lower resting heart rate is just one indicator of fitness, normal RHR is 60-100 bpm

Other biomarkers like blood pressure and cholesterol may be used to determine fitness

 

Kendall Wisehart DPT, ATC Bio