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No excuses. Lift weights at any age! Advice from a 65 year old.

No excuses. Lift weights at any age! Advice from a 65 year old.

A post by Abby Halpin, DPT

 Yes, we are physical therapists, but we don’t just help people get back to where they were before an injury. We also help people level up after rehab.  As experts of the human movement system, we pay attention to what is good for it, and we teach it.  Muscle loss as we age is a huge problem. It affects our mobility, confidence, puts us at risk for falls, and decreases our longevity.  I recently came across this article in the New York Times, and thought, why not have a client tell her story.

Kristin, a participant in Movement Systems fitness programming, was interviewed to share her experience with weight training as a 65 year old. 

(Abby) What is your favorite strength training exercise and why?
(Kristin) “Deadlifting is my favorite.  That’s been a vast surprise to me since I never thought I’d do free weights, let alone deadlift. Being the age I am (65), I grew up thinking  deadlifting was for hunky guys in sweaty, competitive gyms. So wrong! I’ve found that I love how deadlifting makes me concentrate totally, both physically and mentally. It is thrilling to feel myself getting stronger, and to measure my progress by the increasing weight I can lift.” 
 
What led you to begin your strength training program?
“I was in a serious car accident and started physiotherapy with Abby in early 2017.  I’ve always been physically active, but I lost a lot of strength during my recovery so when physiotherapy ended I started doing physical training with her. I also needed to do more weight-bearing exercise to prevent bone loss as I age. Training one-on-one with Abby,  who knows my body quirks and can cheerfully push and encourage me,  has been immensely helpful. I started my physiotherapy with two-pound weights.  Now I can deadlift 145 pounds!” 
 
Have you noticed a change in how you move about your day since beginning your weightlifting routine?
“I love feeling stronger. And lifting things in everyday life  – from heavy shopping bags to suitcases and boxes of books – is much easier. I’m more conscious about my overall posture/alignment and it has improved.  And I’m less afraid of injuring myself.” 
 
What has surprised you the most about strength training?
“What has surprised me most about deadlifting in particular is how almost meditative it can be since it needs such  physical and mental focus. As I lift heavier weights, I’m working on and appreciating the mental/emotional side of it,  how it fosters the need to be positive and believe you can do it. It’s wonderful to talk positively to one’s self.” 
 
Is there anything else about your lifting life you’d like to share?
“It’s a cliche, but you truly are never too old to start.  Your body and brain will thank you.”
If you are interested in learning how you can safely and confidently begin strength training, consult a physical therapist. We are equipped to perform health screening prior to beginning a program, and we are experts in exercise prescription for the human movement system.

5 Reasons Why You Should Try Pilates

5 Reasons Why You Should Try Pilates 

Guest Blog by Allison Moss

Before I share Allison’s awesome blog post, I want to thank her and Club Pilates on Mercer Island for opening up their doors to us.  As a physical therapist, I am always trying to find ways for patients to either become more active or to diversify how they move to maintain a healthy movement system. Pilates is a great option, and Allison does a great job of explaining more…

Take it away, Allison.

Pilates has blown up in the U.S. these last few years and it has everyone wondering what it is about this system that has people flocking into the studios. Pilates is a progressive approach to modern-day fitness that helps people from all walks of life come into the studio with confidence that their instructor will know how to safely and effectively give them the best workout for their body. Whether you are dealing with an injury, recovering from a surgery or just wanting to add in another form of exercise; Pilates has you covered! So, let’s take a look at a few reasons you should consider trying Pilates.

  1. Pilates focuses on the powerhouse, which is the core and back muscles or the midsection of your body. These muscles initiate and support our every movement and also help to protect our spine by strengthening the muscles that surround it. The Pilates Method develops a significantly strengthened core through specifically targeted exercises using fun and integrated techniques to challenge you with every class.
  2. Pilates is a gentle workout that isn’t going to harm the body which is mainly done on an apparatus called a Reformer. The Reformer is a bed like structure and has a carriage that is on wheels and uses resistance via springs connected underneath. Laying down and being able to work out horizontally allows you to use a resistance that is lighter than your body which is very useful for anyone going thru physical therapy or with any medical conditions.
  3. Pilates provides a full-body workout, making sure that you leave every class feeling balanced, energized and focused. Paying attention to all planes of the body, Pilates offers a whole-body commitment in every class. Connecting your mind and body to each exercise helps you understand how and why you benefit from Pilates exercises and keeps you coming back for the same good feeling every time you leave.
  4. Pilates instructors really know their stuff. A major requirement for instructors is that they know anatomy and have knowledge of injuries and medical conditions and how Pilates can help with each one. They look at the why behind each exercise and provide safe progressions for those who are ready by layering on their exercises, this means by starting with the basic foundations of the movements and adding on progressions so that everyone gets the work out they are looking for.
  5. Every class is a new experience. Pilates instructors strive to bring new innovative techniques to keep the classes fun, engaging and challenging while still keeping all the original concepts and principles. Awareness, breath, control and efficiency play a huge part in every exercise and while they keep things fun and new these are always the upmost focus of each class.

 

 

High Intensity Resistance Training for Osteoporosis: Are we playing it too safe?

High Intensity Resistance Training for Osteoporosis:

Are we playing it too safe?

By Carrie Hall PT, MHS

 

The CDC and Surgeon General, along with many researchers1 have proposed that exercise plays a role in prevention and treatment of osteoporosis, but the effect has been perceived to be moderate at best. Debunking this myth, a preliminary study in Australia has shown that high-intensity resistance and impact training (HiRIT) may improve bone and muscle strength in healthy postmenopausal women with osteoporosis.2

Maybe we have been playing it too safe?

It is known that bones respond preferentially to high magnitude weightbearing loads, but most physical therapists prescribing exercise are hesitant to apply high loads to persons with osteopenia (thinning bones) or osteoporosis (low bone density) for fear of risk of injury or fracture. This study aimed to demonstrate that high intensity resistance and impact loading is both safe and effective in improving bone mass and overall physical function.

What did this study do differently?

Researchers analyzed data from the larger Lifting Intervention for Training Muscle and Osteoporosis Rehabilitation (LIFTMOR) Trial on 101 postmenopausal women age 58 or older. For eight months, half of the women did twice-weekly 30-minute sessions of supervised HiRIT that included deadlifts, overhead presses, squats and jumping chin ups with drop landings. The other half formed a comparison group, and for eight months they did unsupervised, twice-weekly 30-minute low-intensity exercise at home.

The graduated loading, close ongoing supervision, and focus on correct technique were key to safety and overall adherence to the program (low drop-out rate). The 2 time per week dosage was also very appealing to this demographic leading to high compliance (participating with expected dosage).

All the participants had bone mineral density testing with a special type of X-ray called a DXA scan before and after the eight-month training program to assess changes in their bone mineral density (BMD), or bone health, at the spine and the femoral neck at the very top of the thigh bone that connects the long bone to the head of the femur.

By the end of the study, the HiRIT participants increased BMD in their spines by an average of about 3 percent and increased hip BMD by 2.2 percent. In the comparison group, women lost an average 1.2 percent of spinal BMD and lost more than 2 percent at the hip, researchers report in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

The benefits of bone density improvements at the femoral neck and spine translate into stronger hips and backs. Women in the resistance group also had a 40 percent improvement in back and leg extensor strength, which helped improve their posture and reduce their risk of falls.

Close ongoing supervision is key!

The researcher of this study felt this demographic has traditionally been held back from high intensity resistance training for fear of fracturing fragile bone with heavy loading, but that this overly conservative approach has led to stagnation in the field. This study demonstrates preliminary evidence for safety and effectiveness of a HiRIT program for otherwise healthy postmenopausal women with low to very low bone mass.

Key to the success of this program is that HiRIT training should be supervised by adequately trained and educated professionals such as a physical therapist, to ensure correct technique and appropriate progressions, as well as to minimize injuries.

WE DO NOT RECOMMEND INDIVIDUALS WITH LOW BONE MASS TO UNDERTAKE THIS PROTOCOL IN AN UNSUPERVISED ENVIRONMENT, even after notable training, because it is not possible to self-monitor technique or self-prescribe dosage.

Despite misconception to the contrary, high intensity resistance training can be safe and has proven to be effective in improving bone mass.

Consult your PT if you are interested in beginning a program such as this.

Happy lifting!

 

  1. Howe TE, Shea B, Dawson LJ, et al. Exercise for preventing and treating osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2011(7):CD000333.
  2. Warson SL, Weeks BJ, Weis LJ, et al. High-intensity resistance and impact training improves bone mineral density and physical function in postmenopausal women with osteopenia and osteoporosis: The LIFTMOR Randomized Controlled Trial. JBMR. 2017.

 

Carrie Hall PT, MHS – President